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Friday, March 16, 2012

Classic Raglan KAL // Week 3


You may recall that last Friday I was on the last repeat of hip shaping. After that I did have a slight fall back, I tried the pullover on and realized that the hip shaping was a little high on me. My last Classic Raglan was a 34 but since I would like a fitted sweater for Spring I am knitting a 32. What hadn't occurred to me was to follow the lengthwise measurements of the larger size, especially since I am long in the body. I ripped back at Knit Night which was painful (and painful to watch I'm sure, I wore my sad face the whole time), but it didn't take long to recover the lost stitches and once again feel ahead of the game.



I am currently half way through sleeve number one. I knit the collar on when I was halfway through the body, I always do this, it's easier to assess how well the garment is fitting this way, it sort of pulls everything together. 

I'm loving the way the entire sweater is fitting, I can't wait to wear it when it's finished, it's going to be a wardrobe staple. 

How is your Classic Raglan coming along?

Hop on over to the Canadian Living craft blog and check in! We're also talking about it in our Ravelry group.

13 comments:

  1. It looks beautiful! Are you knitting the sleeve using the magic loop method? I have never used it before, but I thought it needed two needles. I'm not a big fan of dpn's and I would much prefer to knit the sleeves this way.

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    1. I am using the magic loop method, it makes the sleeve fly off the needle! I have a video tutorial for the magic loop, you can find it if you just go to the Tutorials tab at the top of the page.

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    2. Ooh, I will have to check it out! Thank you.

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  2. I'll admit, I'm not doing the knit-along...yet! But I'm wondering about ripping back and how you go about doing that? Could you point the way to some good tips or do tutorial on that?? (or is it too elementary....) I try to avoid it b/c I don't know how to do it properly!

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    1. The hardest part of ripping back is mourning the loss of so many stitches. If you are working in stockinette it is the easiest process to actually do... Just remove your work from the needles, rip back (rip the stitches right out, row after row) until you get to where you need to be, then put your stitches back on the needle. You could worry about which way the stitches are facing when you pick them up but I prefer straighten them out on my first row of knitting... pay close attention to this, if your stitch is twisted knit into the back of it instead and it will correct itself.

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    2. For me it's easier to rip back the stitches and use a long sewing needle and waste yarn to recover the stitches, and then transfer the stitches to the needles. It seems like the extra step would make the process longer, but I find I lose less stitches that way.

      also,to make sure you don't lose the beginning of your round, go to the stitch before the marker, and make sure the stitches on either side are secure, then pull out the the number of rows for that line of stitches. This also helps keep track of the right place to stop ripping.

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    3. Really good advice Hannah. It always gets easier the more you do it. I use to be lousy at recovering my stitches and it always felt so awkward to do... it gets easier with practice.

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  3. I'll have to check out your tutorial. Did you use magic loop for the collar? I have my gauge all set and will be starting tonight. I was planning on using DPN to start the collar since I'm doing a size 34.

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    1. I used dpns for the collar, I just find it easier to pick up the stitches that way. I think with the size 34 I was actually able to knit the collar on a 24 inch circ that I had in collection :)

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  4. Frogging is well worth the time and regrets.
    I'm loving this one.
    hugs
    Gerry

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  5. I am absolutely adoring this sweater. I know it is a simple, basic garment, but this is one of those things I know I would wear the crud out of. Question for you: I am just loving the Paton's natural mix you did yours in. I have been reading comments on this yarn though, and it seems others are saying it pills A LOT! I just don't want to spend that kind of time on something only to have it do that, especially something I would wear a lot. Your opinion, since you said you have been wearing yours non-stop? Thanks~Jan

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    1. I am sad to say that it does pill a ton. During the colder months I was wearing this pullover like it was part of my uniform and the fuzz balls were out of control. I'm really looking forward to how my Classic Raglan # 2 compares knit out of Cascade 220.

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  6. Thanks so much, Jane. That definitely decides that for me. I have knit several things of Cascade 220, but never a pullover, and what I have knit has held up soooooo well. No pills, perfect. The only thing I could say is, it does seem to have a lot of elasticity. In other words, things seem to cling to you, so I think I am going to use a larger needle, even when I obtain gauge with one a size smaller. I do think I will wait until you are finished with yours and hear your comments on the whole thing. No hurry for me, I won't be able to wear it until next fall anyway.~Jan

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